Simple Raw Dog Food2021-12-27T17:19:30-08:00

The Doggytread Protocol Raw Dog Food Primer

Have you been wanting to say goodbye to feeding your dogs mystery meats and hard-to-pronounce ingredients? You think you’d like to feed raw? But don’t know how to start or feel intimidated by the process?

You don’t have to be rich to feed a raw diet to your dog, or be near a specialty shop. Look no further than your local grocery store.

Before heading out, here are some things to think about.

Potential benefits of feeding a raw diet to your dog include:

  • Shinier coats
  • Healthier skin
  • Cleaner teeth
  • Higher energy levels
  • Smaller stools
  • Less gas

Potential risks include:

  • Threats to human and dog health from bacteria in meat
  • Extended periods of unbalanced diets can damage dog health
  • Potential for whole bones to choke an animal, break teeth, or cause an internal puncture

Dogs that should not be on a raw diet:

  • Dogs on chemotherapy or suffering immunosuppressive diseases
  • Dogs with pancreatitis or other digestive tract diseases start with cooked, homemade diet

Still sound like something you would like to try? Doggytread is here to help.

A raw diet consists of:

  • Muscle meat, often still on the bone
  • Bones, either whole or ground up
  • Organ meats such as liver or kidneys
  • Raw eggs
  • Vegetable like broccoli, spinach and celery
  • Apples or other fruit
  • Some dairy, such as yogurt
  • Kelp

Without further ado, here we go!

DoggyTread DIY Raw Dog Food Recipe

This is the do-it-yourself alternative to purchasing pre-made pet food from the store.

Fair warning!

This recipe is not for the faint of heart, as it involves cutting and chopping of raw meat and bone. But you can rest assured that this process makes the highest quality dog food.

This is intended for dogs who are capable of crushing or chewing raw poultry bones in their mouth. A healthy dog over 30 pounds, give or take, should be capable of this. Use your best discretion as a pet owner.

Current Doggytread mascot Tito Puente, a Rottweiler, consumed two whole turkeys, with the exception of the largest leg shanks, at the age of three months. He required no assistance, no coaching, and simply left those shanks uneaten.

A natural prey diet consists of:

  • 80% meat (60% meat / 20% fat)
  • 10% bone
  • 10% organ


Doggytread slightly modifies those ratios, adding an additional 10% organ meat.

Using that modified ratio, prey will be recreated at the supermarket and supplemented with fish oil and kelp.

  • 10 pounds whole turkey or chicken (raw)
  • 2 pounds beef liver
  • Fish oil (capsules or liquid)
  • Organic kelp meal

Using a whole bird ensures an ideal meat-to-bone ratio for proper absorption of calcium, in particular.

Raw poultry bones and connective tissue are also excellent bio-available sources of glucosamine and chondroitin. Never feed cooked bones of any kind to your dogs.

What else do you need to make your own dog food?

Minimal tools are required, and you may already have them in your home.

  • A large cleaver or hatchet
  • A sharp, non-serrated knife
  • A knife sharpener
  • Leather gloves
  • Safety glasses (optional)
  • An extra “dog food” refrigerator located outside your primary kitchen (optional)

Leather gloves are your friend. Wear them.

Leather gloves protect your hands from un-intended strokes of a blade and the point ends of bones while prepping food for your dog.

Time to cut up the bird. Don’t overthink it.

Find a location to chop up the bird, preferably outside.

It is helpful to have a log or stump available to serve as a chopping block. If this is unavailable, you can simply set the bird on the ground.

Using a combination of your cleaver/hatchet and the smooth (fillet) knife, cut your bird up into doggy-sized portions.

Time to cut up the bird. Don’t overthink it.

Find a location to chop up the bird, preferably outside.

It is helpful to have a log or stump available to serve as a chopping block. If this is unavailable, you can simply set the bird on the ground.

Using a combination of your cleaver/hatchet and the smooth (fillet) knife, cut your bird up into doggy-sized portions.

Whole chicken can halved with a whack from the cleaver, or even be broken down with a good steak knife.

Whole turkey can require larger implements, such as a hatchet from your local sporting goods section.

How big are your portions? It depends on the size of your dog.

A Rottweiler or German Shepherd can be served a single, large portion, which it will have no trouble crushing in it’s jaws. A smaller dog will require smaller portions to prevent obesity, as well as to accommodate a smaller sized jaw.

Parting out an entire bird at once is recommended, which can then be stored for feeding the rest of the week, or frozen.

How much should the dogs be fed?

3-4% of body weight per day; this means 1.5-2 pounds per day for a 50 pound dog.

“Bread” it with kelp, about 1/2 tablespoon per 25 pounds of dog.

Add the fish oil (capsules or liquid) each day.

Ratios of 10 pounds of whole turkey / chicken to 2 pounds of beef liver make it easy to calculate proper portions of organ meat.

Toss in some beef liver 2-3 times a week.

Voila, raw dog food!

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